Tuesday, October 2, 2007

The Xenos Threat

I just love over dramatic blog titles :)

The Tyranids were painted, again, by you guessed it... dry brushing. Scab Red, Red wash and another final coat of Scab Red was used to paint the outer skin of theses beasties. Although something was missing, they looked like their skin should be shinny. So I looked at that flesh wash and smacked a coat on for good measure. The end result was nice. The guns were painted black with a gray concotion, lightly dry brushed over (1 part white, one part black). This shine is contrasted my the hard, gritty, dull look of the chitinous armor that only gives these buggers a 5+ armor save (you guys got boned by evolution man).
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They really did a nice job with these sculpts. The miniatures really do give off the impression that they are swarming (no matter how badly painted they are)
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In the end I really appreciated the Tyranid Sperm Pods, um er I mean Spore Mines. These guys were easy, tentacle pink (I miss spelled tentacle, spell check asked me if I meant Testicle oops), red wash and then more pink. Easy.
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Oh yeah the armor was painted using Hawk Turquoise with a final dry brushing of the same with skull white. The bases were easy too. Bestial brown (2 coats). Elemer's glue over the base, dipped in sand and then patches of static grass applied. Games Workshop kills me. Their painting guide tells you how to paint the friggin sand too. Who the heck paints sand? Take my advice, it looks good regardless, don't waist your time. Oh yeah, why do they call it "static" grass?

1 comments:

Mik said...

Of your TAP examples, which all look good by the way, I think its the 'Nids here that benefit the most.

Painting sand? Seriously, I agree, it's friggin' sand, why paint it?

Static grass got its name because after you glue a patch down, lightly blow on it, and the ends will stand up (like static electricity). Do this step after you seal you model though or it won't work correctly.